What’s an MPRT you might ask? Response time ratings on monitors can be a bit tricky. Some companies boast an impressive 1ms speed, but are less keen on advertising that it’s based on GTG (grey to grey) specifications. Low response times measured from black to white are an improvement, but Motion Picture Response Time (MPRT) is supposed to be a better measurement of a monitor’s performance. MSI recently announced the Optix MPG27C and MPG27CQ gaming monitors, and the specifications are already really good before even seeing the MPRT response time. So far, the only difference between the two models seems to be that one has a 1440p resolution while the other has a 1080p res. Both monitors support 144 Hz refresh rate, but it’s the Freesync range that’s impressive. They both can go as low as 48 Hz with their adaptive sync range. The 1800R curvature is a great feature in my opinion and while I’ve only gotten to spend a little time with a curved monitor, I certainly fell in love with it. I also believe that 27 inches is the perfect size for gaming at a computer desk, since larger screens start making it difficult to track gaming movements on the edges of the screen. One interesting feature that MSI adds is blue light reduction. This concept for reducing eye strain is spot on and while programs like F.Lux work for this, hardware level blue light reduction won’t have the game compatibility issues that software can have. What impresses me the most about these monitors is that they aren’t boasting amazing IPS panels as part of their features. IPS gets all the credit for having great response times and great colors, yet MSI is managing a 1ms MPRT response time with VA panels. While this was news for me, it turns out Samsung introduced this technology a little while back. Personally, I’m a huge fan of VA panels since they typically have very vibrant colors that look great in the style of games I usually play. They tend to be a bit cheaper than IPS panels, but look much better than the host of TN monitors I’ve owned (and still own). There is one thing I wish I could see on 1080p screens though, and that’s HDR technology. HDR is still the single most amazing screen technology I’ve seen and while having it on 4k monitors is great and all, the improved pixels is why 1080p would benefit the most from it. Speaking of partnerships though, MSI is teaming up with Steelseries to bring Gamesense to the Optix lineup. No gaming peripheral would be complete without RGB lighting as of late (I’m not complaining), and the light bar at the bottom can be used for more than fancy looks. Apparently it can be synced with critical game stats like health bars, ammunition, maybe even cooldowns, so you have another way to keep track of what’s happening during play. The light bar on the bottom isn’t the only one though, since MSI has an amazing looking light pattern going on at the back of the monitor. I understand that it may seem pointless to some degree, but can’t something be cool for the sake of being cool!?! To be fair, there could be a slightly useful benefit since back lighting can help with eyestrain as well, but it would largely depend on if the brightness was enough to compliment the screen properly. I still think it looks really cool and I want it! There’s a lot of fancy things going on with these MSI Optix monitors and while the price is going to match it to some degree, it might surprise you. The MPG27C is currently $450 on Amazon (no sign of the MPG27CQ yet) and while that’s higher than other 1080p screens, monitors that have this much gaming flair tend to run quite a bit more. There are some more affordable options out there that aren’t offering as many features, but I imagine value will depend on how much the buyer wants what MSI is offering. Quite frankly though, I think you might be impressed and if you want more information, follow the links below. https://www.amazon.com/MSI-OPTIXAG32.../dp/B079NPP2TX https://www.msi.com/Monitor/Optix-MPG27C/Overview https://www.msi.com/Monitor/Optix-MPG27CQ/Overview

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