Introduction Asrock isn’t always considered a serious contender among motherboard manufacturers by many users, and that’s a real shame. Even if the company has humble beginnings, they have some great options for motherboards as of late. That said, Ryzen gave every manufacturer a big challenge to work with and just because Asrock has done great with previous designs, it doesn’t mean the X370 Taichi is going to instantly follow suit. We’ll need to take a closer look to see how the Taichi measures up. There’s another important factor that I wanted to address in this review. As stated previously, Ryzen was a difficult release for motherboard manufacturers to prepare for. As someone who prizes a smooth user experience over everything, X370 has given me some interesting issues with certain boards. The Asus Crosshair VI Hero has some quirky issues that never resolved after several BIOS updates and while the Aorus GA AX370 Gaming 5 became a pretty stable platform, I did have one huge scare that involved my entire system refusing to turn on after finishing a stress test run. These ended up being minor issues after figuring them out (or living with them), but I’m hoping the X370 Taichi can give me a great user experience that translates to smooth, daily use. Let’s continue with a word from the manufacturer, then begin looking at the board itself. ASRock Inc. is established in 2002, specialized in the field of motherboards. ASRock strives to build up its own brand. With the 3C design concept, “Creativity, Consideration, Cost-effectiveness”, the company explores the limit of motherboards manufacturing while paying attention on the eco issue at the same time, developing products with the consideration of eco-friendly concept. ASRock has been growing fast and become world third largest motherboard brand with headquarter in Taipei, Taiwan and branches in Europe and the USA. The young and vibrant company targets from mainstream to enthusiast MB segments for different kinds of users, owning reputation around the world market with its reliability and proficiency. Hmm, I think the English could use a little work in that statement, but I’m not going to argue with “Cost-effectiveness.”

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